Pictures That Speak Volumes #71

Old Stuff Magazine

Photo Credit: Old Stuff Magazine

This is an incredible photo that shows the beautiful silent language that animals sometimes share with humans. I believe that animals can sense when people are hurting, suffering, or experiencing times of despair or hardships.

There are times when I feel that animals were put on this earth for not only the enjoyment of the human race but also for healing, joy, and comfort.

Look at the absolute happiness and delight in this crippled person’s eyes…proving once again, that a photo really is worth a thousand words!!

Advertisements

Learning to Stand in Times of Trouble

Photo Credit: Rigor via Pixabay

Photo Credit: Rigor via Pixabay

Bringing a giraffe into the world is a tall order. A baby giraffe falls 10 feet from its mother’s womb and usually lands on its back. Within seconds it rolls over and tucks its legs under its body. From this position it considers the world for the first time and shakes off the last vestiges of the birthing fluid from its eyes and ears. Then the mother giraffe rudely introduces its offspring to the reality of life.

In his book, “A View from the Zoo”, Gary Richmond describes how a newborn giraffe learns its first lesson. The mother giraffe lowers her head long enough to take a quick look. Then she positions herself directly over her calf. She waits for about a minute, and then she does the most unreasonable thing. She swings her long, pendulous leg outward and kicks her baby, so that it is sent sprawling head over heels.

When it doesn’t get up, the violent process is repeated over and over again. The struggle to rise is momentous. As the baby calf grows tired, the mother kicks it again to stimulate its efforts. Finally, the calf stands for the first time on its wobbly legs.

Then the mother giraffe does the most remarkable thing. She kicks it off its feet again. Why? She wants it to remember how it got up. In the wild, baby giraffes must be able to get up as quickly as possible to stay with the herd, where there is safety. Lions, hyenas, leopards, and wild hunting dogs all enjoy young giraffes, and they’d get it too, if the mother didn’t teach her calf to get up quickly and get with it.

The late Irving Stone understood this. He spent a lifetime studying greatness, writing novelized biographies of such men as Michelangelo, Vincent van Gogh, Sigmund Freud, and Charles Darwin.

Stone was once asked if he had found a thread that runs through the lives of all these exceptional people. He said, “I write about people who sometime in their life have a vision or dream of something that should be accomplished and they go to work.

“They are beaten over the head, knocked down, vilified, and for years they get nowhere. But every time they’re knocked down they stand up. You cannot destroy these people. And at the end of their lives they’ve accomplished some modest part of what they set out to do.”

– Craig B. Larson, Illustrations for Preaching & Teaching from Leadership Journal
Read more at http://www.motivationalwellbeing.com/motivational-stories-2.html#ixzz3gfhD81Ef

A Lesson From Nature

Photo Credit: Louisville USACE via CC Flickr

Photo Credit: Louisville USACE via CC Flickr

Throughout our lives, we all have opportunities to learn life lessons from many, many things. Everyone of us experience hardships and difficult times but the key is what we learn and how we handle these situations. A foolish person will dwell on the negative experience, may become depressed and suffer bouts of anxiety, sickness or other kinds of physical distress. A wise individual will take the awful circumstance, learn from it, and become a better person because of it.

Today’s little “story” demonstrates a wonderful lesson that we can all learn from some animals that you may never have thought of before. I hope that you can use this little “nugget of truth” the next time you go through a difficult time of your life (or if you are struggling through a tough time in your life right now).

————————–

THE BUZZARD

If you put a buzzard in a pen that is 6 feet by 8 feet and is entirely open at the top, the bird, in spite of its ability to fly, will be an absolute prisoner. The reason is that a buzzard always begins a flight from the ground with a run of 10 to 12 feet. Without space to run, as is its habit, it will not even attempt to fly, but will remain a prisoner for life in a small jail with no top.

————–

THE BAT 
The ordinary bat that flies around at night, a remarkable nimble creature in the air, cannot take off from a level place. If it is placed on the floor or flat ground, all it can do is shuffle about helplessly and, no doubt, painfully, until it reaches some slight elevation from which it can throw itself into the air. Then, at once, it takes off like a flash.

————–

THE BUMBLEBEE
A bumblebee, if dropped into an open tumbler, will be there until it dies, unless it is taken out. It never sees the means of escape at the top, but persists in trying to find some way out through the sides near the bottom. It will seek a way where none exists, until it completely destroys itself.

————-

PEOPLE
In many ways, we are like the buzzard, the bat, and the bumblebee. We struggle about with all our problems and frustrations, never realizing that all we have to do is look up!

————-

That’s the answer, the escape route and the solution to any problem…. just look up!

Sorrow looks back,

Worry looks around,

But faith looks up! Live simply, love generously, care deeply, speak kindly, and trust in our Creator, who loves us.